Thursday, June 6, 2013

Simple Knitting

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So much yarn-related activity is happening right now.  A flurry of yarn.  A blizzard.  In-progress scarves and hats are everywhere (I guess because I’m cold?) and crocheted (non-granny!) squares, worked Just Because.  Just because that’s what one does.  Yesterday, I found myself hanging around waiting in the hallway of a university engineering department, waiting with anticipation for something good to happen (which it did) and of course, as I waited, I whipped out a ball of yarn (you would have, too) which drew some looks of confused intrigue from the passing scientists.  They had clearly never seen the likes of me.  I was having a confidence crisis anyway, and feeling a little bit simple, you know, surrounded by geniuses as I was, and I found I was just kind of clinging to my little squares, working madly at them, in a big hurry to finish one and have something to show for myself.

More cotton/angora dishcloths.  They comfort me, from the knitting to the scrubbing.  That yarn lived in my cupboard for so many years, just waiting to become something useful.  I see it’s discontinued now, which is too bad.  It makes the best ever dishcloths.

19 comments:

  1. as an english woman, i find it fascinating that you ( and lots of other american ladies of course) knit your own dish cloths ! is this pretty well the norm in america? please could you give us a bit of a history lesson.
    I would never ever think to make such a thing, buying the cheapest cotton ones i can get at the supermarket. they get heavy use and rough treatment including daily bleach and hot water and the odd hour or so in the dish washer. yours are far to lovely AND handmade !!! to treat like that so tell us how you can bear to clean up pots and pans with those beauties xx

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    1. Susanhal.... as a Latin American import to the States, I could say, that it is the norm but only with ladies that are crafty and enjoy working with their hands. Otherwise, you can find them in quaint little shops all over the country. :) They clean well also and last quite a bit ;D Kristen...as always, after I leave your lovely place, I take up my knitting needles and begin once again... m.

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    2. Hi Susan,

      Yes, I think mb is quite right about this--I make them and use them, but I am of a mind to craft stuff. My non-crafty friends (yes, I know! I'm working on them) still buy the cheap cotton ones. :)

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    3. I've knitted and crocheted cotton dishcloths for decades. Far superior to any in the store and cheaper, too. I also use up the scrap yarn to crochet small cloths for cleaning the toilet. Clean, then toss out! Nylon netting, cut into strips, crochets into round scrubbers for pots & pans.
      I wash and bleach the dishcloths until they are beyond use, then toss them away and reach for a new stack. :)

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  2. Ditto on that! I always wonder, cause I use a dish washing sponge :-) The cloths look lovely, though.

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  3. I really want to make dishcloths. Mine would be crocheted, because I know not how to knit, but it looks like such a good idea. And I have a LOT of scratchy cotton yarn that I shudder to think about using for much else...

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  4. I made my first dishcloth a while ago and then stared at it for a bit - then tentatively wiped a few things with it - then actually allowed it into the washing up bowl - and since then it's been washed, bleached, tumbled and scrubbed with and do you know what - it's FAB! Mine was made with a heavy duty cotton so it is quite forgiving though - yours look beautiful - I think I'd just want to snuggle up to them instead! Janex

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  5. What a beautiful shade of blue :) It sounds like that department needs a little yarn bombing in their hallways? Glad you kept your identity in tact. Wendy

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  6. I too make my own and love them . . .but have always used 100% cotton for the absorbancy . . .how does angora work in there - to me it seems like it would give a waxy - non absorbant feeling?

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    1. Nope, they hold a lot of water and feel very, hmm, maybe "full" is the word I want? Quite good for scrubbing. :)

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  7. thanks for that Kristen ! they really are pretty. I don't think i have ever met anyone who does this in england but i have a vague recollection of being taught to knit one as a very small child. did i ever finish it ? can't remember, but it taught me to knit !
    love your granny square blanket by the way, it is on my list xx
    susan

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    1. Loads of people on Ravelry make their own dishcloths, even in Great Britain!Stylecraft do a 'craft cotton' which is ideal for the purpose. It's very hard-wearing and doesn't mind being bleached.

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  8. Lovely,lovely dishcloths. Were you at a job interview? Do tell. :-)

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    1. Thankee, Nana! No, not me--'twas the final day of my husband's (eight-year!) PhD program. He successfully defended his dissertation! :)

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  9. Hello Kristen - I think it's just great that you got busy with the knitting in such a situation - I recently crocheted a dishcloth and presented it to my husband!!! He didn't want to use it because he reckoned it was too good to mess up!!!
    Anyway, it has been used (by myself) and bleached and mis-treated and still looks great. I used an 8 ply cotton for it.
    I hope you had good results from your wait in the hallway.
    Joy x

    joyjinkscreations.blogspot.com

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  10. They are the prettiest colour dishcloths I've seen ever!

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  11. Simple things are sometimes the most delightfully. Love the colors you chose. Just prfedt!

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  12. They're far to pretty to use as dishcloths :)

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  13. I love visiting your blog and landing on the blanket pile in the header. It makes me feel calm and peaceful. Thank you!

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