Friday, April 10, 2015

Napping quilt for springtime

 

 

 

 

Springtime. It's still so gloomy and gray, but somehow it bothers me so much less. The sky is like iron, the ground is murky and soft. There are no flowers yet, but the daffodils have poked out of the ground--a sure sign that we have made it through. And rain, every day, which makes a nap seem like it would be so nice. The new pup really likes to sleep--she gets up late, does a few lazy stretches, goes reluctantly out into the weather for a minute or two, eats a good breakfast, and goes back to bed. Wanders back out in a few hours, maybe chews on a bone, takes another nap. We walk in the orchard where the mud is ankle deep, come home for a bath, curl up in front of the fire. This is a dog I can live with.

The quilt is done, and it is so satisfyingly rumply and soft. Improving weather makes the quilts happen. They seem so perfect for warm days spent lying sprawled in a sunbeam. There is so much rain I feel like I'm living underwater, but if a sunbeam should appear, I will be ready.

It's impossible not to nap.

The backing is a beautiful piece of vintage cotton lawn that's been lingering in my fabric stash while I entertained ultimately futile thoughts of making some kind of shirt-dress/tunic thing, but in the end this is the best place for it. I realized that although I might like to imagine myself wearing some kind of floaty, romantic frock made from a delicate green sprigged batiste most likely meant for baby clothes, it is probably pretty unlikely to happen. I could just envision the entire hopeful day spent cutting up this perfectly soft fabric, then pinning, stitching, pressing and finishing a whole beautiful dress, probably with some kind of contrast peter pan collar and little cuffs, and then looking at myself in the mirror wearing it, and having that sinking feeling, that realization that I didn't look at all like Tess of the D'Urbervilles, but more like a delusional old granny. So I saved myself the aggravation and put it on the back of my napping quilt, and I am pretty happy about it.

 

This quilt is 60" x 72", with wool batting (oh, do try this. It is dreamy!) and quilted with big, utility quilting stitches and #5 perle cotton. Git 'er done! There are 30 log cabin blocks, with 3" center squares and 2" log strips. I used scraps and leftovers. I still have so many scraps and leftovers. More quilts to come.

31 comments:

  1. I do LoVe this quilt.! It is absolutely, perfectly, beautiful. I would also like to snuggle up under it. Your days sound like wonderful spring days.
    Blessings,
    Betsy

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  2. it's beautiful! And when I saw your blog post title, I immediately thought of the book, _The Napping House_ by Don and Audrey Wood.

    You are smart to see that pretty batiste for what it is :) This is a sign of wisdom, not delusional granny.

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  3. I love this quilt! The light/dark contrast is beautiful. And I just adore the quilting. I have about 40 completed log cabin blocks sitting in a drawer that are just waiting to be pieced together and quilted. Maybe I'll take your suggestion, buy some wool batting, and get it done!

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  4. Makes me wish I could quilt. I have a machine and everything. Alas all I can do is hem a sheet to make a curtain. This is stunning!

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    1. Melissa, making quilts requires the willingness to cut up perfectly good fabric, the patience to sew it all back together again, and ability to sew a straight line. You might check out the Missouri Star Quilt Company videos on YouTube to see just how it easy it can be. I can't recommend quilting enough as a pastime.

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    2. Yes, you can do it! If you can sew, you can make a quilt. And anybody can sew. :)

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  5. Its the most beautiful quilt I have seen x

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  6. Bravo on that gorgeous quilt - a family heirloom for sure! Lucky family!
    ((hugs)), Teresa :-)

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  7. So beautiful, a lovely piece of work.

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  8. I love that the middle square in the Log Cabin pattern denotes the fireplace of the cabin. Make sit so folksy somehow. I think your quilt turned out just brilliantly. An excellent finished article, for sure. x

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  9. Looks great! I'm a firm believer that one can never have too many quilts. And if I could be reincarnated as one, I'd want to belong to a child like my daughter who finds new uses for her quilts every day.

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  10. Nailed it! I bet the back of it feels just like a nap. I love your description of cutting and sewing such a piece of fabric into a garment, only to realize it's not how you pictured it in your head. Been there.
    This worked out beautifully.
    And would you please tell your dog to tell my dog about the sleeping in bit? My dog likes the 5:30a.m.where'smybreakfast schedule.

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  11. Your quilt looks so comfy, wish I could sew :)

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  12. What a beautiful, beautiful quilt. Happy napping.
    Anne xx

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  13. Well, if you ever need a good home for another of those gorgeous, cuddlesome quilts.......

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  14. This is a lovely thing, and so inviting for a snuggle with a dog on a rainy miserable day. Again, I am in awe of your skills.

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  15. this is definitely a winner...just beautiful!!

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  16. Even tho it looks scrappy and haphazard at first glance, you obviously put some thought into the color placement. Look at those lights and darks playing with each other!! ~swoon~

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  17. I have loved following this quilting journey of yours...with the mention of a pup thrown in to boot. What a great combo! My German Shepherd quilting buddy of 14 years recently passed and I miss her laying on my quilt while I worked on it. Hold on to the thoughts of Spring, it will come as promised. - Robin Elaine

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  18. Kristen, this is a beautiful piece of art, just gorgeous.
    Hugs,
    Meredith

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  19. Do you have any idea of how long it takes to hand quilt something this size? I'm making a quilt, its all sandwiched and ready for me to go at it, but its kind of scary, I've never hand quilted something before, and it's pretty big. Any ideas?

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    1. I can finish a queen size quilt in a day if I have enough podcasts to keep me entertained, but it is hard on the fingers to do that. Of course, it is only possible because I use utility quilting, rather than the eensy 12 stitches/inch heirloom quilting-style stitches my grandma would have used. Quilting it that way would take me at least ten years, and might never be finished.

      You can do it, give it a try! :)

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  20. AAAGHHHH! It is a sight a behold. Well done you on sitting it out - the quilt and winter. Jo x

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  21. I'm sure you would have pulled off Tess of the D'Urbevilles, but quilt backing is good too. It's a thing of beauty indeed, you're inspiring to press on with the one I'm working on. CJ xx

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  22. It's gorgeous! I wish you could give me a quilt making workshop. I think it would be fun...

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  23. I love your quilt. I think of all the quilt patterns out there, the log cabin is still my favorite.

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  24. Can I just say how much I love the concept of a 'napping quilt' am so going to have to borrow that phrase

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