Tuesday, March 12, 2019

Making progress








Yesterday was mean to me, so this morning I got up, had coffee in my pajamas, looked out at the gray gloomy sky, and crawled in under a wool blanket with my sweet, warm Catdog for a cozy nap.  Every time I take a nap, I have the same dream about that strange secret extra room in the house that I keep forgetting about, where there are stacks of beautiful furniture and which has skylights and its own bathroom and I always think to myself, "I should really come in here more often."  The view from the windows in there is so nice, and it looks out onto gardens that are not there, which is somehow never a clue that I am, in fact, asleep.  Waking up in my regular house, which has no mysterious doors at all, is weird after that.




Look at this chip-carved drop spindle!



Friends, my wonderful Doc made that for me, because he apparently can do anything, and he will do so if I ask him to.   Inspiration for it came directly from a photograph in this book, and I am wasting no time now in commissioning many more, in different sizes and designs, as long as I can keep his enthusiasm for it going.  I think it helped that I sat right down and spun up a whole hank of yarn on it immediately, and he could see that it worked well and that I was in love with it.  I made this heathered teal 2-ply yarn, and it was so much fun I couldn't believe it.  Slow, slow work, but what's the rush anyway?  I spin with it while sitting cross-legged somewhere soft so that when (not if) I drop it, nothing bad will happen, which means that most of the drafting is happening above my head and it's hard to peer at through my bifocals and also my old arms are aching, but that's not stopping me, no sir.  I may have ordered some spinning fiber.


Oof, that's rather nice, no?  It's so much more consistent than what I can make on my wheel.  Slowing down is good for me.

Speaking of slow, here's the third block (of nine) in my hand-pieced quilt top.  I anticipate this will take a long time, but its such a satisfying process, just poking along with a needle and thread.  So calming, which, as I've said many times, is a state that does not come naturally to me.  I have to go get it, so I sift through my stashes of yarn and fabric and create some calm for myself.


Obviously I'm knitting sweaters.  There are so many.  I can't even photograph them all.  I'm awash in ideas, which I find both thrilling and also slightly anxiety-making, because I love to feel creative, but gah!  I can not even come close to keeping up.  It keeps me awake at night, I mean it.  So, sweaters continue to happen at a rate I can not control.  At least these two aren't gray.  The stranded yoke sweater is a version of Lovage by Marie Wallin (more on this to come, when it's finished) and you can see from the scribbly drawing that the one up top is my own, knit up in Malabrigo Worsted, "Pearl Ten", "Vetiver", "Orchid", "Manzanilla Olive" and either "Polar Morn" or "Frost", because of course the labels are long gone and I can't remember.  Anyway, that yarn is deliciously soft, so this sweater has been a late-winter sweatshirt for me, and a very welcome addition to my wardrobe.  Both of these projects are attempts to knit from the stash, and it surprised me to discover how much fuchsia is showing up for me lately.  I have a lot of fuchsia yarn in the stash?  Huh?  Well, I do.  Anyway, knitting with color has been fun for a change.  Spring must be coming.  Please, let spring be coming.




21 comments:

  1. Love the colour of the yarn - beautiful!

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    1. I'm really into fuchsia right now, apparently! :)

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  2. gorgeous stripey as usual (& I don't like stripes as a rule) love fairisle but most i find too busy for my eyes to cope with but one day I'm going to give it another go (made one for a 4yr old nearly 30yrs ago) your knitting still amazes me, beautiful works
    love the spindle & it's handmade too, even better! can't wait to see more
    your quilt is also coming along nicely
    thanx for sharing

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    1. Didn't he do a good job on that spindle? Swoon! xoxo

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  3. Love Marie Wallin and everything she does. I met her at Edinburgh Yarn Festival a couple of years back and she's a sweetheart. I'll see her again in a couple of weeks' time at this year's EYF. You ought to come along one day. Spring is just around the corner, pinky-promise. x (Dreadful event on Fair Isle at the weekend where the bird observatory and guesthouse was razed to the ground. The family who owned it and lived there have lost everything).

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    1. EYF is the dream! One of these years I will get there. Sad to hear about the bird observatory--hope they can rebuild. xoxo

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  4. ps your new spindle is beyond gorgeous and made with love which is all the more reason to treasure it. Also loving the colours in your new quilt.

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  5. Your stranded work is beautiful. I find it very addictive seeing a pattern emerge and I have to be careful not to get all excited and hold the wraps too tight!You spindle is amazing. Some men can just come up with the goods eh?

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    1. All the color changes do make you want to just keep going, don't they? I get the yoke done in a flash and then the plain parts take a bit longer. xoxo

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  6. You might recall we communicated a while back.....so being mostly a quilter (altho a sometimes knitter and lately big cross stitcher!) I am loving your hand pieced new quilt blocks! I love hand piecing, and always have one or two (or 20) projects going at any particular time.Love all of your sweaters too.....I know what you mean about being awake in the night thinking about all of these projects. But looking at all the fabrics and yarns, still make my heart sing! Keep stitching....... Mona

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    1. Hi Mona! I hope we never get tired of sorting through our stashes and thinking about projects. It keeps me going, in good times and bad. I'm so glad to hear from you! xoxo

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    2. In 1989 I hand pieced a Dresden Plate variation quilt queen sized! Decided recently that I want a smaller version. Found the old book it was in, and just now, found the templates from 30 some years ago....now all I have to do is start tracing, and sewing!!! It's good to save stuff! Im excited to start my new/old project!

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  7. Love that fair isle! And the rest of your projects, too. That's a beautiful spindle.

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    1. Thank you, Judy! I've been kind of focusing on that sweater lately, watching the patterns emerge. So thrilling! xoxo

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  8. the pattern looks complicated but what a result, something really special and the colours are beautiful.

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    1. It's very impressive-looking, isn't it? Just two colors at once, though, easy peasy. xoxo

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  9. Replies
    1. It is, really. If I've gotta have a recurring dream, I'm glad it's this one. :D

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  10. Love you stripy jumper! And I know what you mean about creativity keeping you up at night. So much to make and try out! Happy knitting!

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  11. Beautiful! Like all the colors and the beautiful yarn....and the oddness and contrast of the pieces that don't fit in with the color scheme of the gray piecing....like many people who stand out but make the world beautiful.

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